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  1. Dzisiejszy Snapshot 21w42a wprowadza nową muzykę dla przyszłej aktualizacji "Jaskiń i Klifów cz.2". Usprawniono także punkt odradzania. Więcej... Przeczytaj cały wpis
  2. No matter how good your content is, how accurate your keywords are or how precise your microdata is, inefficient crawling reduces the number of pages Google will read and store from your site. Search engines need to look at and store as many pages that exist on the internet as possible. There are currently an estimated 4.5 billion web pages active today. That's a lot of work for Google. It cannot look and store every page, so it needs to decide what to keep and how long it will spend on your site indexing pages. Right now, Invision Community is not very good at helping Google understand what is important and how to get there quickly. This blog article runs through the changes we've made to improve crawling efficiency dramatically, starting with Invision Community 4.6.8, our November release. The short version This entry will get a little technical. The short version is that we remove a lot of pages from Google's view, including user profiles and filters that create faceted pages and remove a lot of redirect links to reduce the crawl depth and reduce the volume of thin content of little value. Instead, we want Google to focus wholly on topics, posts and other key user-generated content. Let's now take a deep dive into what crawl budget is, the current problem, the solution and finally look at a before and after analysis. Note, I use the terms "Google" and "search engines" interchangeably. I know that there are many wonderful search engines available but most understand what Google is and does. Crawl depth and budget In terms of crawl efficiency, there are two metrics to think about: crawl depth and crawl budget. The crawl budget is the number of links Google (and other search engines) will spider per day. The time spent on your site and the number of links examined depend on multiple factors, including site age, site freshness and more. For example, Google may choose to look at fewer than 100 links per day from your site, whereas Twitter may see hundreds of thousands of links indexed per day. Crawl depth is essentially how many links Google has to follow to index the page. The fewer links to get to a page, is better. Generally speaking, Google will reduce indexing links more than 5 to 6 clicks deep. The current problem #1: Crawl depth A community generates a lot of linked content. Many of these links, such as permalinks to specific posts and redirects to scroll to new posts in a topic, are very useful for logged in members but less so to spiders. These links are easy to spot; just look for "&do=getNewComment" or "&do=getLastComment" in the URL. Indeed, even guests would struggle to use these convenience links given the lack of unread tracking until logged in. Although they offer no clear advantage to guests and search engines, they are prolific, and following the links results in a redirect which increases the crawl depth for content such as topics. The current problem #2: Crawl budget and faceted content A single user profile page can have around 150 redirect links to existing content. User profiles are linked from many pages. A single page of a topic will have around 25 links to user profiles. That's potentially 3,750 links Google has to crawl before deciding if any of it should be stored. Even sites with a healthy crawl budget will see a lot of their budget eaten up by links that add nothing new to the search index. These links are also very deep into the site, adding to the overall average crawl depth, which can signal search engines to reduce your crawl budget. Filters are a valuable tool to sort lists of data in particular ways. For example, when viewing a list of topics, you can filter by the number of replies or when the topic was created. Unfortunately, these filters are a problem for search engines as they create faceted navigation, which creates duplicate pages. The solution There is a straightforward solution to solve all of the problems outlined above. We can ask that Google avoids indexing certain pages. We can help by using a mix of hints and directives to ensure pages without valuable content are ignored and by reducing the number of links to get to the content. We have used "noindex" in the past, but this still eats up the crawl budget as Google has to crawl the page to learn we do not want it stored in the index. Fortunately, Google has a hint directive called "nofollow", which you can apply in the <a href> code that wraps a link. This sends a strong hint that this link should not be read at all. However, Google may wish to follow it anyway, which means that we need to use a special file that contains firm instructions for Google on what to follow and index. This file is called robots.txt. We can use this file to write rules to ensure search engines don't waste their valuable time looking at links that do not have valuable content; that create faceted navigational issues and links that lead to a redirect. Invision Community will now create a dynamic robots.txt file with rules optimised for your community, or you can create custom rules if you prefer. Analysis: Before and after I took a benchmark crawl using a popular SEO site audit tool of my test community with 50 members and around 20,000 posts, most of which were populated from RSS feeds, so they have actual content, including links, etc. There are approximately 5,000 topics visible to guests. Once I had implemented the "nofollow" changes, removed a lot of the redirect links for guests and added an optimised robots.txt file, I completed another crawl. Let's compare the data from the before and after. First up, the raw numbers show a stark difference. Before our changes, the audit tool crawled 176,175 links, of which nearly 23% were redirect links. After, just 6,389 links were crawled, with only 0.4% being redirection links. This is a dramatic reduction in both crawl budget and crawl depth. Simply by guiding Google away from thin content like profiles, leaderboards, online lists and redirect links, we can ask it to focus on content such as topics and posts. Note: You may notice a large drop in "Blocked by Robots.txt" in the 'after' crawl despite using a robots.txt for the first time. The calculation here also includes sharer images and other external links which are blocked by those sites robots.txt files. I added nofollow to the external links for the 'after' crawl so they were not fetched and then blocked externally. As we can see in this before, the crawl depth has a low peak between 5 and 7 levels deep, with a strong peak at 10+. After, the peak crawl depth is just 3. This will send a strong signal to Google that your site is optimised and worth crawling more often. Let's look at a crawl visualisation before we made these changes. It's easy to see how most content was found via table filters, which led to a redirect (the red dots), dramatically increasing crawl depth and reducing crawl efficiency. Compare that with the after, which shows a much more ordered crawl, with all content discoverable as expected without any red dots indicating redirects. Conclusion SEO is a multi-faceted discipline. In the past, we have focused on ensuring we send the correct headers, use the correct microdata such as JSON-LD and optimise meta tags. These are all vital parts of ensuring your site is optimised for crawling. However, as we can see in this blog that without focusing on the crawl budget and crawl efficiency, even the most accurately presented content is wasted if it is not discovered and added into the search index. These simple changes will offer considerable advantages to how Google and other search engines spider your site. The features and changes outlined in this blog will be available in our November release, which will be Invision Community 4.6.8. Przeczytaj cały wpis
  3. There’s no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to moderating/guiding an online community. Each digital world includes its own series of hurdles to overcome. As a community gains momentum and the registration count climbs higher, community moderators are presented with new challenges. These tasks become inherently more complex as a result, siphoning precious resources and oftentimes paint moderators into a corner. Take back the brush and illustrate a new scene with these supportive tips on how to better engage with your community. These pro-moderation tactics aim to foster a greater sense of togetherness and unity while also acknowledging individual members for their contributions. Clear and concise community guidelines. These are the building blocks for a solid foundation. Community guidance is less about different means of restriction and more about the ability to express one’s thoughts and feelings in a healthy way. All communities will inevitably run into toxic trolls, but instead of exerting energy on the negative, give praise and accolades to the positive. As we mentioned in a previous blog post about community guidance, show your community in the guidelines how you want them to post by contributing that way yourself. That sets a precedent. From there, you'll notice other community members participating in a way that is similar to you (TL;DR lead by example). Curate member content. Curating member content is the secret sauce to accelerated growth when it comes to community building. Featuring your members' posts publicly demonstrates your desire to embrace participating members. It’s one thing to comment on members’ topics, it’s another to feature and promote them for all to see. It gives added depth to your community by amplifying differing opinions, builds trust and encourages others to partake. It’ll take extra effort on your end to manually curate content (be selective regarding what topics you want to represent your community); establishing multiple authorities in your community builds momentum. Remember, people come for the content, but stay for the community. Give them both! Moderate on the offense. Moderating has a bad rap. Generally speaking, most view it as a prohibitive tool. A member posts profanity? Moderate! A topic goes live in the wrong section? Moderate! A spam bot infiltrates the latest blog entry? Moderate, moderate, moderate! That aspect of community building will always exist, but setting up automations will save you time and money. More importantly, it creates an elevated user experience because your attention is spent engaging with your members. We have some powerful tools at your disposal to help, including a designated ‘automatic moderation’ section in your Admin Control Panel. Here, community leaders can set up rules that will trigger automatic content moderation. For example, you could create a rule that automatically hides content when it receives three or more user-submitted reports. If your members collectively agree another member’s post is problematic, and three or more of them report it, the post is hidden from public view until a moderator has a chance to review it. Moderation doesn’t have to be a dirty word. And if it does, we have an automatic moderation tool for that, too. Publicly recognizing members. Members who refuse to follow your community guidelines likely won’t fall in line with a public reprimand. Either privately message them your concerns or issue a warning only the moderation team can see. Instead, focus your attention on recognizing and rewarding contributing members. There’s a number of ways you can energize morale, including responding to members’ positive posts, manually or automatically awarding badges with our Achievements system, highlighting engaged members in a sidebar block, showcasing Leaderboard champs or even interviewing your MVPs. The idea is to approach community guidance with open arms – not a closed fist. Team work makes the dream work. There’s a reason it’s cliché. Organizing then empowering a moderation team is essential. Once on the same page in terms of expectations and processes, a community leader is then faced with the daunting task of relinquishing control as their team gears up to congratulate and moderate. Your moderation team is only one moving part of a well-oiled machine. There are times, especially in the early days of a community where, as the community leader, you’re doing most of the heavy lifting. However, there will come a time when the community supports you in return and shares the weight. It’s important to recognize those instances and publicly acknowledge them! The world has enough doom and gloom; be an inspiration to your community and in return they’ll inspire you. Do you have a community management tip to share? Drop it into the comments. We’d love to hear from you! Header photo: Unsplash Przeczytaj cały wpis
  4. There’s no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to moderating/guiding an online community. Each digital world includes its own series of hurdles to overcome. As a community gains momentum and the registration count climbs higher, community moderators are presented with new challenges. These tasks become inherently more complex as a result, siphoning precious resources and oftentimes paint moderators into a corner. Take back the brush and illustrate a new scene with these supportive tips on how to better engage with your community. These pro-moderation tactics aim to foster a greater sense of togetherness and unity while also acknowledging individual members for their contributions. Remember these like your life depends on it! Red light! Confusing and arbitrary rules. Green light! Clear and concise community guidelines. These are the building blocks for a solid foundation. Community guidance is less about different means of restriction and more about the ability to express one’s thoughts and feelings in a healthy way. All communities will inevitably run into toxic trolls, but instead of exerting energy on the negative, give praise and accolades to the positive. As we mentioned in a previous blog post about community guidance, show your community in the guidelines how you want them to post by contributing that way yourself. That sets a precedent. From there, you'll notice other community members participating in a way that is similar to you (TL;DR lead by example). Red light! Only share team-created content. Green light! Curate member content. Curating member content is the secret sauce to accelerated growth when it comes to community building. Featuring your members' posts publicly demonstrates your desire to embrace participating members. It’s one thing to comment on members’ topics, it’s another to feature and promote them for all to see. It gives added depth to your community by amplifying differing opinions, builds trust and encourages others to partake. It’ll take extra effort on your end to manually curate content (be selective regarding what topics you want to represent your community); establishing multiple authorities in your community builds momentum. Remember, people come for the content, but stay for the community. Give them both! Red light! Moderate on the defense. Green light! Moderate on the offense. Moderating has a bad rap. Generally speaking, most view it as a prohibitive tool. A member posts profanity? Moderate! A topic goes live in the wrong section? Moderate! A spam bot infiltrates the latest blog entry? Moderate, moderate, moderate! That aspect of community building will always exist, but setting up automations will save you time and money. More importantly, it creates an elevated user experience because your attention is spent engaging with your members. We have some powerful tools at your disposal to help, including a designated ‘automatic moderation’ section in your Admin Control Panel. Here, community leaders can set up rules that will trigger automatic content moderation. For example, you could create a rule that automatically hides content when it receives three or more user-submitted reports. If your members collectively agree another member’s post is problematic, and three or more of them report it, the post is hidden from public view until a moderator has a chance to review it. Moderation doesn’t have to be a dirty word. And if it does, we have an automatic moderation tool for that, too. Red light! Publicly reprimanding members. Green light! Publicly recognizing members. Members who refuse to follow your community guidelines likely won’t fall in line with a public reprimand. Either privately message them your concerns or issue a warning only the moderation team can see. Instead, focus your attention on recognizing and rewarding contributing members. There’s a number of ways you can energize morale, including responding to members’ positive posts, manually or automatically awarding badges with our Achievements system, highlighting engaged members in a sidebar block, showcasing Leaderboard champs or even interviewing your MVPs. The idea is to approach community guidance with open arms – not a closed fist. Red light! Flying solo. Green light! Team work makes the dream work. There’s a reason it’s cliché. Organizing then empowering a moderation team is essential. Once on the same page in terms of expectations and processes, a community leader is then faced with the daunting task of relinquishing control as their team gears up to congratulate and moderate. Your moderation team is only one moving part of a well-oiled machine. There are times, especially in the early days of a community where, as the community leader, you’re doing most of the heavy lifting. However, there will come a time when the community supports you in return and shares the weight. It’s important to recognize those instances and publicly acknowledge them! The world has enough doom and gloom; be an inspiration to your community and in return they’ll inspire you. We’ve already come too far to end this now. Do YOU have a red light, green light community management tip? Drop it into the comments. We’d love to hear from you! Przeczytaj cały wpis
  5. W tym tygodniu czeka nas dość mały snapshot 21w41a, ale z interesującymi zmianami. Mojang pełnię swoich sił przeznacza na Minecraft LIVE, które odbędzie się w tym tygodniu. Więcej... Przeczytaj cały wpis
  6. Dark Blood Theme Theme compatible with IPS 4.5 I am not updating it anymore due to lack of time and willingness to deal with this theme. Theme carefully crafted by developers. I am offering it for sale because it may be useful to someone. No Live Demo Unfortunately. Screenshots: Profile view: Topic view: Home Page: Theme compatible with IPS 4.5 after purchase you have to update it yourself to the latest version of IPS. Przeczytaj cały wpis
  7. Snapshot 21w40a jest już dostępny, czekają nas kolejne zmiany w generowaniu terenu, oraz kilka zmian w systemie spawnowania mobów w grze. Więcej... Przeczytaj cały wpis
  8. W snapshocie 21w39a otrzymaliśmy możliwość otwierania światów ze starszych wersji, lekkie zmiany odnośnie generowania się wysokich gór oraz nowe osiągnięcia. Więcej... Przeczytaj cały wpis
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  11. Dimension Dark by ipsfocus Dimension Dark (also available in a light version) is a theme for IPS.Suite which recycles your background image throughout the theme. The header collapses into a fixed bar at the top of the page once it has been scrolled, providing easy access to your navigation links. DEMO Theme Features Theme Settings Easily enable, disable or modify theme features such as background images, logos, social media links and colors. This makes modifications and upgrades very simple since little code changes are required. Fixed header on-scroll Once scrolled, your header collapses and sticks to the top of the page. The background image becomes blurred (in compatible browsers), placing focus on your navigation links. 'Inherited' background images Title bars inherit the same background image as your header, maintaining a consistent color scheme throughout your suite. The Customizer The Customizer allows your members to customize certain elements of your theme based on their own preference. Background picker If enabled, your members can choose their own background image or color from a predefined selection. Their choice is saved via cookies and automatically load each page visit. A "Random" option will randomize the background on each page load. Mobile Footer A sticky footer at the bottom of mobiles provides easy access to commonly used areas throughout your site. HTML logo with slogan Easily add/edit your text logo and slogan from within the theme settings. If required, the text can be replaced by an image instead. Guest message A customizable message can be shown to guests, prompting them to either register or login to your forum. Two designs, "billboard" and "alert" (shown) are available. Latest Topic on Mobiles The latest topic title is visible on tablets and mobiles, allowing more convenient access to your latest content for mobile users. Social links Social links can be enabled/disabled and customized to your own URL, allowing you to easily link to your social network pages (facebook, twitter, etc) Mega Footer A mega footer with configurable column numbers and content can be enabled and customized all within the theme settings. Retina Ready All gradients, shadows and icons are generated using css which means your site will look great on all devices - even those with high resolution screens. Przeczytaj cały wpis
  12. illuminate (Dark) by IPSfocus DEMO illuminate is a minimal, modern theme for Invision Community. Available in both light and dark variants (sold separately), the theme has a compact header which neatly contains the logo, navigation, user panel and search bar. The glowing bars throughout the theme allow you to easily incorporate your color scheme - and the color of the bar can also be customised on a per-category basis which is especially great for sports teams, brands, games or movies. Theme features Theme Settings Easily enable, disable or modify theme features such as background images, logos, social media links and colors. This makes modifications and upgrades very simple since little code changes are required. Category-specific colors Optionally assign a unique color to each category. Especially useful for sport teams, games or movie categories! The Customizer The Customizer allows your members to customize certain elements of your theme based on their own preference. Background picker If enabled, your members can choose their own background image or color from a predefined selection. Their choice is saved via cookies and automatically load each page visit. A "Random" option will randomize the background on each page load. Mobile Footer A sticky footer at the bottom of mobiles provides easy access to commonly used areas throughout your site. HTML logo with slogan Easily add/edit your text logo and slogan from within the theme settings. If required, the text can be replaced by an image instead. Guest message A customizable message can be shown to guests, prompting them to either register or login to your forum. Two designs, "billboard" and "alert" (shown) are available. Latest Topic on Mobiles The latest topic title is visible on tablets and mobiles, allowing more convenient access to your latest content for mobile users. Social links Social links can be enabled/disabled and customized to your own URL, allowing you to easily link to your social network pages (facebook, twitter, etc) Mega Footer A mega footer with configurable column numbers and content can be enabled and customized all within the theme settings. Przeczytaj cały wpis
  13. NewsBot

    illuminate

    illuminate by IPSfocus DEMO illuminate is a minimal, modern theme for Invision Community. Available in both light and dark variants (sold separately), the theme has a compact header which neatly contains the logo, navigation, user panel and search bar. The glowing bars throughout the theme allow you to easily incorporate your color scheme - and the color of the bar can also be customised on a per-category basis which is especially great for sports teams, brands, games or movies. Theme features Theme Settings Easily enable, disable or modify theme features such as background images, logos, social media links and colors. This makes modifications and upgrades very simple since little code changes are required. Category-specific colors Optionally assign a unique color to each category. Especially useful for sport teams, games or movie categories! The Customizer The Customizer allows your members to customize certain elements of your theme based on their own preference. Background picker If enabled, your members can choose their own background image or color from a predefined selection. Their choice is saved via cookies and automatically load each page visit. A "Random" option will randomize the background on each page load. Mobile Footer A sticky footer at the bottom of mobiles provides easy access to commonly used areas throughout your site. HTML logo with slogan Easily add/edit your text logo and slogan from within the theme settings. If required, the text can be replaced by an image instead. Guest message A customizable message can be shown to guests, prompting them to either register or login to your forum. Two designs, "billboard" and "alert" (shown) are available. Latest Topic on Mobiles The latest topic title is visible on tablets and mobiles, allowing more convenient access to your latest content for mobile users. Social links Social links can be enabled/disabled and customized to your own URL, allowing you to easily link to your social network pages (facebook, twitter, etc) Mega Footer A mega footer with configurable column numbers and content can be enabled and customized all within the theme settings. Przeczytaj cały wpis
  14. NewsBot

    Story

    Story app Vala Story is an app that allows members to share their moments, interests, joys, portfolios, etc. with others through images and videos by allowed formats on your board and make them more interactive with title and link. Demo and Showcase: http://ips.valacoding.com/index.php?/calendar/ final-desktop-story.mp4 Vala Story has a powerful ACP settings and tons of customization options and member settings as well. let's take a look : ACP Options : Main Settings: Select story type [ Image / Video / External video / External image0] Set daily number of submit story Show stories from x days ago Set maximum stories to show Specify allowed image formats Specify image file size Specify allowed video formats Specify video file size Set duration of the story show time Set maximum image story Height/Width' Set menu item icon Permission Settings Allow groups to submit Allow groups to view Allow groups to delete a story Allow groups to share again a story Allow groups to change status of a story Submit Form Settings Allow members to set the appearing time of a story Allow members to insert title for a story Allow members to insert link for a story Allow members to use external link instead of uploading file Default Widget Settings (Each widget can use the default or its own custom settings) Select skin (SnapGram, FaceSnap, SnapMessenger and Custom) Use last story image as avatar Show stories as a list Enable open effect Enable cube effect Enable Auto full screen Enable Pagination arrows Enable Back button Enable Back native Enable Previous tap Enable seen mod (seen stories are displayed with opacity) General Style Seen item opacity Story viewer background Story viewer font color Title font color Title background color Carousel Display Settings (shows stories as a slideshow) Space between elements Enable carousel navbar Enable loop Enable lazy load Enable autoplay Set autoplay timeout Enable auto play hover pause Skin Style 3 predefined skins (SnapGram, FaceSnap, SnapMessenger) Custom Skin Change border color of each skin Change font color of each skin Size Settings (size of show box) Media size type (Cover, Contain, Fill) Desktop width/height Mobile devices width/height ACP Stories Setting Disable/Enable member status Admit/Ban member Add the stories to featured list (use this option in fetching data) Remove member stories (all stories) Share again a story of members Disable/Enable a story of specific member Remove a story of specific member Members Options Add/Delete/Disable/Re-share a story Specify which group can view their stories (All visitors, Only members) Enable/Disable their status Member Submit Form Widget Types Showing all member Showing followers stories Showing following stories Show stories for each member in the profile page Widget Options Add title Enable member add story button on widget's title bar (left side) Specify number of stories to show Select featured stories Sort by last updated (Ascending, Descending) Widget max-height (auto, X pixel) Items display direction (Row-carousel mode, Column-list mode) Custom carousel setting (use this for customization of the default setting) Story Settings (Default, Custom) (you can change the default setting for each widget) Przeczytaj cały wpis
  15. Po ostatniej dużej aktualizacji jaka się pojawiła w wydaniu snapshot 21w38a otrzymujemy znacząco mniej zmian ale jest też kilka nowości i powrót twierdz (stronghold) i telemetrii na potrzeby optymalizacji gry. To już drugi snapshot dla aktualizacji Jaskiń i Klifów cz. II. W wydaniu 21w38a znalazły się głównie poprawki błędów, ale jest też kilka nowości i technicznych dodatków, jak osobny suwak odległości symulacji oraz zwiększona liczba wątków. Udało się przywrócić ponownie twierdze podziemne i generują się one już poprawnie. Snapshot 21w38a - Lista zmian UWAGA!!! - Ten snapshot nie jest nadal kompatybilny ze starymi światami, a sam zapis światów może czasami zajmować więcej czasu niż zwykle. Nowości Sprint nie jest już zakłócany, jeśli delikatnie ocieramy się o okoliczne ściany podczas sprintu. Dodano nowy suwak w ustawieniach grafiki - simulation-distance byty poza ustawionym obszarem symulacji nie będą aktualizowane, dzięki tej opcji można zwiększyć zasięg renderowania obrazu obniżając użycie CPU. Dodano nowy parametr dla serwera w pliku server.properties - simulation-distance Dodano telemetrie: zaimplementowane tylko w zdarzeniu ładowania świata, dane wysyłane są podczas ładowania świata dla jednego gracza lub łączenia się z serwerem dla wielu graczy, zawiera następujące informacje: identyfikator programu uruchamiającego, identyfikator użytkownika (XUID), identyfikator sesji klienta (zmienny przy restarcie), identyfikator sesji światowej (zmienny w zależności od obciążenia świata, do ponownego wykorzystania w późniejszych wydarzeniach), wersja gry, nazwa i wersja systemu operacyjnego, wersja środowiska uruchomieniowego Java, jeśli klient lub serwer jest zmodowany (te same informacje co w dziennikach awarii), typ serwera (pojedynczy gracz, Realms lub inny), tryb gry. Zmiany Ruda miedzi generuje się do poziomu Y = 95 i została zwiększona jej ilość. Ruda lazurytu tworzy się podobnie jak inne rudy, zamiast się rozprzesrzeniać. Teraz różne zadania w tle, w tym generowanie świata, są wykonywane w puli wątków w tle. Rozmiar puli wątków jest równy Ilość dostępnych rdzeni CPU - 1. Maksymalna liczba wątków to 255, a nie 7. Ten limit może zostać przesłonięty przez parametr Java max.bg.threads. Poprawiono ponad 17 błędów z wcześniejszych wydań gry. Przeczytaj cały wpis

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